Nov 302022
 
best cover songs of november 2022
Bob Dylan – I Can’t Seem to Say Goodbye (Jerry Lee Lewis cover)

Bob Dylan doesn’t change his setlists much anymore. In fact, on his recent UK and European tour, he played the exact same setlist every single night…except one. The day it was announced Jerry Lee Lewis passed away, Dylan returned to the stage after his usual finale “Every Grain of Sand.” As anyone who’s read his new book knows, Bob knows his music history. So he skipped the obvious picks and tackled the quite obscure Sun Records-era outtake “I Can’t Seem to Say Goodbye.” Continue reading »

Nov 302022
 
Alela Diane Sandy Denny

Singer-songwriter Alela Diane has been making records steadily the better part of two decades, including this year’s Looking Glass, produced by Tucker Martine. Chief among the web of Diane’s influences appears to be the legendary folk-rock troupe Fairport Convention and, more specifically, Sandy Denny, that group’s magnetic lead vocalist and figurehead. In support of Looking Glass‘s recent, Diane has shared a new cover of Sandy Denny’s best-known solo number, “Who Knows Where the Time Goes?,” performed in a live session for The Line of Best Fit. The video capture and Diane’s performance are both mesmerizing, spooling out in long, slow lines. Diane is practically a dead ringer for Denny here too — standing alone with the song’s singularly haunting spirit, illuminated with just the right amount of echo and bravado. Continue reading »

Nov 292022
 
chiptune pokemon

Step aka Step On Newgrounds is a YouTuber and musician who is also an aspiring game developer. He goes by Stephan Wells IRL, and his talent as both a musician and arranger is undeniable in this 8-bit cover of Ed Sheeran “Celestial.” 

The original “Celestial” was featured on the credits of the game Pokemon and Scarlet Violet. While Sheeran’s version of the tune feels more like something you might hear in the club, Step’s genre-blends chiptune with ’80s vibes, leading to an oddly satisfying sonic experience. 

Step shows off his skills as an arranger in this iteration of “Celestial.” It starts out with 80s-feeling vocals, jagged held synth chords, multiple moving lines, and cheerful bleep-bloops. The underlying vocal harmonies, as well as Step’s diction, are absolutely impeccable. About halfway through, we get more of a dancey break before the B-section comes. The way that Step layers the two themes as we crescendo to the final choruses is chill-worthy. Not to mention, the accompanying video for his cover of “Celestial” is extremely cute and artistic, featuring watercolor-style depictions of Game Boys and Pokemon characters. 

Head here for more interesting Ed Sheeran covers.

Nov 292022
 
Hurray for the Riff Raff

We’ve featured Hurray for the Riff Raff a few times at Cover Me since they first started recording in the aughts. A vehicle for singer-songwriter Alynda Segarra, the band’s line-up has changed over the years as has their sound. But they aren’t the first group you think of when you think ’80s covers. Continue reading »

Nov 222022
 
nessa barrett

Nessa Barrett is an American pop singer who first rose to fame in 2019 on Tiktok. She recently released a unique soundscapey pop cover of the 2007 Arctic Monkeys song “505”. “505” has always held a special place in the hearts of Arctic Monkeys fans and indie enthusiasts. The song details a relationship that is falling apart: The twist of a knife, falling short, a fateful meeting, and a girl in her hotel room (hence the number). “505” is about a long-distance relationship, and how a reunion doesn’t turn out to be as cheerful as you had hoped. According to band member Alex Turner, the tune is “The first proper love song we’ve done.” Continue reading »

Nov 212022
 

My IdealI confess I didn’t quite know how to approach Amos Lee’s My Ideal: A Tribute To Chet Baker Sings–with excitement and delight, or merely admiration. I get that this sounds grudging, but in my book Chet was not only one of the best two jazz trumpeters who ever strode this earth, he was also one of the very best singers. Alas, outside jazz circles, he never quite became the household name he could have been. Rock circles knew him best, perhaps, as the horn player on Elvis Costello’s own original version of “Shipbuilding,” arguably a quarter century past his peak. So anyone who can raise his profile, well, that’s fine by me.

Amos Lee has been around for a while, an associate of Norah Jones, and a purveyor of a bluesy folk hybrid style. That he has recorded his first five recordings for Blue Note might also suggest someone somewhere could hear a hint of something jazzier to his bow. Rather than offer any view to his previous, let’s stick with My Ideal, wherein he deigns to replicate the mood of the album Chet Baker Sings, backed by a trio of Philly’s finest. These comprise David Streim on piano and trumpet, Madison Rast on bass, with Anwar Marshall on the drum seat.
Continue reading »