Mar 222017
 

Full Albums features covers of every track off a classic album. Got an idea for a future pick? Leave a note in the comments!

bringing it all back home covers

Bob Dylan’s 1965 Newport Folk Festival concerts is one of the most famous – or infamous – performances of all time, subject to numerous books, documentaries, and debates over why Pete Seeger threatened to cut the power cable with an axe. But the fact is, by the time he stepped on that stage, Dylan had already gone electric, four months prior. The first half of his 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home – which turns 52 today – is all electric. And not the sort of light electric augmentation other folk singers were experimenting with either. The first track “Subterranean Homesick Blues” may still be the loudest, hardest track of Dylan’s entire career. He’d already drawn his line in the sand; the folk-music crowd had just chosen to ignore it.

To celebrate this landmark album’s 52nd birthday, we’re giving it the full-album treatment. Our recent tributes to Dylan albums have covered underrated works like 1978’s Street Legal and 1985’s Empire Burlesque, but today we return to the classics. Such classics, in fact, that in addition to our main cover picks we list some honorable-mention bonus covers for each song. Continue reading »

Sep 022015
 

Welcome to Cover Me Q&A, where we take your questions about cover songs and answer them to the best of our ability.

Here at Cover Me Q&A, we’ll be taking questions about cover songs and giving as many different answers as we can. This will give us a chance to hold forth on covers we might not otherwise get to talk about, to give Cover Me readers a chance to learn more about individual staffers’ tastes and writing styles, and to provide an opportunity for some back-and-forth, as we’ll be taking requests (learn how to do so at feature’s end).

Today’s question, from Cover Me staffer Jordan Becker: What’s a cover that made a significant, annoying, and/or unforgivable change to the original lyrics?
Continue reading »

Nov 172014
 

Despite the fact that the White Stripes stopped making new music back at the beginning of 2011, their influence on the rock stratosphere is still alive and strong. Case in point: Jessica Martindale’s fleshed out, sultry cover of the band’s mainstream breakout hit “Seven Nation Army.” Continue reading »

Jun 182012
 

Sometimes doing something new with a song can mean doing nothing new with the song at all – or, at least, nothing new with the song being covered. That’s precisely the case with Katie Herzig’s take on “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).” The Eurythmics cover in question is fantastically faithful; where it becomes especially awesome, though, is when Katie and the band break – ever so briefly – into The White Stripes‘ “Seven Nation Army.” Continue reading »

Oct 042011
 

If you want to pick a hip song to cover for a children’s project, you could do worse than the White Stripes’ “We’re Going to Be Friends.” Jack Johnson did it for the Curious George soundtrack and now Bright Eyes and First Aid Kit do it for a children’s charity. Continue reading »

Jul 122011
 

The White Stripes may be broken up, but that doesn’t mean they can’t dig through the archives occasionally. In the latest installment of the aptly-named From the Vault series, Jack White and his label Third Man Records unearthed two super-early Stripes gems, both covers. On the a-side, the duo perform a subdued “Signed D.C.,” a Love cover. Then on the flip, they go through Otis Redding’s “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long.” Continue reading »