Oct 162020
 

“Covering the Hits” looks at covers of a randomly-selected #1 hit from the past sixty-odd years.

Don't You Forget About Me covers

Keith Forsey and Steve Schiff wrote “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” while scoring The Breakfast Club. They sent it to Simple Minds, a favorite group of theirs. Simple Minds turned it down, preferring to do songs they themselves had written. Bryan Ferry turned it down. Billy Idol turned it down. Eurythmics turned it down. Cy Curnin of the Fixx turned it down. The record company suggested Corey Hart; Forsey turned them down. Chrissie Hynde loved it, but was pregnant and didn’t want to do the accompanying video, so she badgered her husband to try it. Her husband was Jim Kerr, of (wait for it) Simple Minds.

Once the band came around, they followed Forsey & Schiff’s demo pretty closely, with Kerr throwing in the “Hey, hey, hey, hey” and a few “la la la”s toward the end. After its release, while grateful for the doors it opened, the band sometimes sounded like they wished they’d stuck to their guns and kept turning it down. “(The lyrics) sound pretty inane to me,” Kerr later said. “Sometimes I play it and I just puke.”

It seems like the only people who ever loved the song were the target audience. They took the song to number one and permanently lodged it in the collective conscious of the class of ’85. When Simple Minds performed it at Live Aid (at Bob Geldof’s insistence), the Philadelphia crowd went crazy, and the band realized what they had on their hands was more than just another hit. Thirty-five years later, “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” can bring the era back like few other songs.

Such a song becomes an easy target for artists wanting to cover it. In Spin‘s definitive oral history of the song, Forsey says, “For me, the song only goes one way, and what we did when we did it was the way.” That’s as may be, but that didn’t stop many others from taking it their way. As Schiff says in the same article, “The song has really gone off on its own and has become that thing for other people, and that comes across when somebody else does it. You know, walking by bars in New Orleans, at a karaoke bar and it’s there. It’s sort of fun where it can pop up.”

Seven of them pop up below. Enjoy!

Continue reading »

Jun 212019
 

In the Spotlight showcases a cross-section of an artist’s cover work. View past installments, then post suggestions for future picks in the comments!

kt tunstalls best cover songs

Tunstall’s debut album, Eye to the Telescope, contains crowd favorites such as “Suddenly I See,”  which graces the iconic opening scene of the film The Devil Wears Prada. However, Tunstall’s breakout hit came in 2004, with “Black Horse and the Cherry Tree.” (Woo hoo!) This song is emblematic of Tunstall’s overall style of guitar playing and vocal tone and features the popular Bo Diddley beat. Continue reading »

Mar 142012
 

To cover elitists, there is a clear-cut difference between a cover of something and simply mashing up a song with one of the artist’s own (see: every other Top 40 song that features the chorus of an ’80s song.) It’s a seemingly impossible line to straddle. Mr. & Mrs. Fox manage to achieve the impossible with their brilliant cover mash-up of M83’s “Midnight City” and Simple Minds’ “Don’t You (Forget About Me).” Continue reading »

Dec 062011
 

Five Good Covers presents five cross-genre reinterpretations of an oft-covered song.

It’s hard to think about The Breakfast Club – perhaps the best thing to come out of the ’80s after parachute pants – without recalling one of Simple Minds’ biggest hits: “Don’t You (Forget About Me).” Who can forget the cult classic’s memorable closing scene, Judd Nelson’s triumphant fist-pump into the air? Although Simple Minds had already released a few popular tracks overseas, it wasn’t until 1985, when “Don’t You” appeared in The Breakfast Club, that the Scottish New Wave pop rock band finally entered America’s consciousness. Continue reading »

Jul 062011
 

Full Albums features covers of every track off a classic album. Got an idea for a future pick? Leave a note in the comments!

Imagine hitting your creative and artistic peak at the tender young age of 23 and then having your personal and professional life completely fall apart, with a descent into drug abuse and mental illness. Brian Wilson‘s life followed such a trajectory after the release of his masterpiece, the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds. Written with almost no contribution from the rest of the band, Wilson recorded the album’s instrumental tracks while the boys were on tour in Asia without him. Continue reading »