Apr 032017
 
Aurora Metallica

Cover Me has seen a sudden influx of Metallica covers…a discovery by a new generation of some deep and dark 80’s/90’s hard rock music. Interestingly, the most compelling covers are coming from female singers with serious chops. We recently heard Caroline Baran and Postmodern Jukebox cover “Nothing Else Matters” with a jazzy, soulful vibe and now we can add Aurora to the mix as well.

Aurora consists of Louise Roussety and Owen Chesterton from Australia pumping out “stripped back, southern tinged, folk inflected” songs with a simple recipe of voice and acoustic guitar. Much like the Postmodern Jukebox jazz band, it’s an unlikely setup for a Metallica cover. Continue reading »

Mar 062017
 
postmodern jukebox caroline buran

Caroline Baran is an amazingly talented 15 year old singer who made her debut on old-timey covers series Postmodern Jukebox in 2016 singing Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time”. She was discovered during a Postmodern Jukebox competition, and boy what a discovery. Like a young Alicia Keys, Baran possesses an understanding of music that is far beyond her years. Coupled with a voice that is both technically and musically superb, Baran is a rare young talent, as evidenced in this gorgeous rendition of Metallica’s “Nothing Else Matters”. Continue reading »

Jan 232017
 
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Banjo Guy Ollie is a multi-talented musician from Ireland.  He spends most of his time recording covers of video game music using acoustic instruments.  I first heard of him a couple of years ago when my friend, Dave, sent me the Double Dragon theme song.  (Dave and I spent most of our time in high school at the arcade trying to save Marian from the Black Warriors.)

Ollie admitted to me, though, that occasionally he likes to cover the odd rock/pop tune. His most recent in this category is Metallica’s “Wherever I May Roam.”  For the song, he uses a mandolin, an Irish bouzouki and a five-string tenor banjo.  (I love his creative drumming, as well.) Continue reading »

Sep 302016
 
Fugees

They say nostalgia works in 20-year cycles, and this year the music of 1996 has been in the media a lot. And if you believe the music blogs, it turns out 1996 was a truly groundbreaking year for every possible genre. Over at SPIN: “The 96 Best Alternative Rock Songs Of 1996.” Complex: “Best Rap Songs of 1996.” Junkee: “Ten reasons 1996 was a great year for dance music”. Loudwire: “10 Best Metal Albums of 1996.” Red Bull Music: “1996: Why it was a great year for pop”. Suck it, 1995! (Kidding; similar articles were of course written last year too.)

We’ll be honest: 1996 was not some magical, pioneering year for cover songs. It was also not a terrible year. It was just, you know, another year. There’s no overarching theorem of 1996’s cover songs that wasn’t true in ’95 or ’97. But even so, Cover Me wasn’t around in 1996, so we never made a Best Cover Songs of 1996 list (our first year-end list came in 2009, with the Kings of Convenience’s “It’s My Party” topping it, and you can catch up on all the lists here). So we decided, before the year ends and we take our look at the best covers songs this year, why not take a nostalgic rewind and do 1996 just for fun, twenty years too late. Continue reading »

Feb 102016
 

Under the Radar shines a light on lesser-known cover artists. If you’re not listening to these folks, you should. Catch up on past installments here.

sons of bill

Sons of Bill hails from Charlottesville, Virginia. The band was formed by brothers James, Sam, and Abe Wilson, whose father Bill is a professor of theology and Southern literature at the University of Virginia. The lineup, filled out by Seth Green and Todd Wellons, has honed their sound across four albums. Their latest, Love and Logic, is a huge step forward in the band’s literary and thoughtful brand of Southern rock. Ken Coomer, of Uncle Tupelo and Wilco, produced the record, saying it “takes [him] back to some of the creative heights” he found with the latter band. That’s high praise indeed, but Sons of Bill deserves it. They’ve toured the States and Europe relentlessly, working hard to win fans over one at a time both with their original music and with a selection of covers. The songs they choose reflect their wide range of influences. Here’s some of their best cover work.

Continue reading »