Oct 112019
 

Full Albums features covers of every track off a classic album. Got an idea for a future pick? Leave a note in the comments!

saturday night fever covers

Saturday Night Fever was released in 1977, joining the ranks of great movies that feature dance as a plot line such as the ballerina fairytale The Red Shoes, or the string of Fred Astaire movies with Ginger Rogers (Top Hat, Swing Time, Shall We Dance, and more) and without (Easter Parade, with a post-Oz Judy Garland). This genre also has plenty of popular descendants like Dirty Dancing, Footloose, Save the Last Dance, and Step Up. SNF is both a worthy successor to the older films and a proud forebear of those that followed in its dance steps.

Starring John Travolta before he had really made his mark (post-Kotter, pre-Grease), the story is as old as time: boy wants to escape his mundane job and dramatic family life through dance and pursue the woman of his dreams, who of course is bad for him, along the way. Plus, there is an obligatory Brooklyn v. Staten Island rivalry thrown in for good measure.

The Bee Gees had fallen into a funk, and not the good kind, in the early 1970s. With help from disco and falsetto, the band had found a new groove. Being a major part of the SNF soundtrack – they composed and/or performed eight of its 17 songs – helped breathe new life into their career. The soundtrack contributed three of their six consecutive number-one singles to the Bee Gees streak, at the time tying the Beatles’ record for the most in the United States.

The soundtrack helped the Bee Gees win five Grammys, and the Bee Gees were able to keep up the momentum from this success until the end of the disco era. By the end of the ’70s, disco fever had burned itself out.

Although some of the themes and dialogue from the movie don’t hold up, the songs remain essential for those times when you want to put on your boogie shoes.
Continue reading »

May 032011
 

Download This! scours the web’s dark corners for cool cover freebies. View past installments.

If someone were to give a word-association test for the term “music,” one might respond with “dancing.” Music and dance go hand in hand, whether it’s literally a song about shaking your groove thang or just a song that inspires you to move. Dance is as universal as music; both do not require great intellectual thought, but require our emotions to respond with joy or sadness. Dance is a physical representation of our emotional response to music. Continue reading »

Mar 042011
 

This Week on Bandcamp rounds up our favorite covers to hit the site in the past seven days.

Every week it seems four out of five Bandcamp covers are acoustic bedroom recordings. Well, not this week. The blogosphere has been hit with a heavy dose of dubstep recently – James Blake, Radiohead, even Britney Spears – and so, apparently, has Bandcamp. Three out of the five covers today feature dubstep influences, making it an unusual set indeed. Continue reading »

Nov 102010
 

Live Collection brings together every live cover we can find from an artist. And we find a lot.

The recent release of Easy Wonderful has given Guster fans reason to fall in love with them all over again. As their album title insinuates, they have an agreeable sound that resonates with you and has aged well over the past (almost) 20 years. If the Beach Boys went to college in the 90’s, added some bongos, and stayed out of the sun, Guster is what they would sound like.

Featured on soundtracks like Life as a House and Wedding Crashers, their songs can pull at the heartstrings as you croon along with them. On the other hand, they are better known for their laid-back, wisecracking personalities that beam from the stage and infect their fans. During their years of touring, they have taken on many cover songs with both their sensitive and playful dispositions (but mostly the latter). Typically at the end of a show, Guster will rile up the crowd with a number from Madonna, Talking Heads, or whoever sings the “Cheers” theme song (Portnoy) and get everyone involved.  Most of the time, it’s just an excuse to get drummer Brian Rosenworcel out in front showing off his questionable vocals, calling in the crowd for backup.  It’s just like being at a karaoke bar. Continue reading »

Aug 122010
 

In the Spotlight showcases a cross-section of an artist’s cover work. View past installments, then post suggestions for future picks in the comments!

My Morning Jacket made a name for themselves through epic live shows. Stretching on for up to three hours, the band’s sets don’t skimp on the covers. Their Bonnaroo sets are particularly legendary; their 2008 late night set explored funk with songs by Sly & the Family Stone, Funkadelic, James Brown, Kool & the Gang, Bobby Womack, The Velvet Underground, and Mötley Crüe. More recently they covered John Prine for a new tribute album (download it here).

“We’re trying to find amazing songs that people don’t really listen to anymore, who would hear them and go, ‘Oh, my god — why haven’t I listened to this forever?” drummer Patrick Hallahan told Spinner about what songs they select to cover. “They have to be out of rotation for a little while before we pick them up.”

In this installment of In the Spotlight we look at five of their best. The range spans from Americana to new wave, obvious choices like The Band mixed in with more surprising ones like Berlin. Some get performed for years while others only come out once or twice. The band plays a monster New York City stand in October, performing each of their albums for charity. Hopefully they’ll find time for a cover or two. Continue reading »