Jun 092020
 
Joseph Shabason

Gymnopédie No.1 is the most famous of Erik Satie’s Gymnopédies and probably one of his most iconic compositions. A soft, lilting melody for piano, legend has it Satie introduced Paris to it by having a pianist play all three pieces during the reception prior to his scheduled performance. Whether or not the story is apocryphal, it’s characteristic of Satie’s satiric wit and innovative approach to composition. The Gymnopédies may not technically be part of his infamous “furniture music,” but they are are an important precursor. A piece like this shows why Satie is regularly regarded as the godfather of ambient.

Saxophonist and composer Joseph Shabason takes this legacy seriously. As part of Western Volume’s Composure: Classical Reworks for Modern Relief series, Shabason has updated the first Gymnopédie with an ambient jazz vibe. The piano is still there, but it takes a while for it to enter. Loops and samples provide the backdrop, but also the introduction. When the piano does enter, over a minute in, it is accompanied by Shabason’s saxophones taking part of the melody. Violinist Drew Jurecka guests, adding to the ambient background noise.
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Jun 052020
 

If you’ve seen The Sopranos, you know Alabama 3’s “Woke Up This Morning.” It’s arguably now one of the most famous themes in TV history. Few songs are so associated with a particular type of TV show, even though the song predated the show by a couple years. The moment you hear the title line, it’s almost impossible not to envision Tony Soprano driving through New Jersey.

Guts Club clearly don’t want that connection. Though nominally a folk group, this New Orleans duo has taken an entirely different approach on this cover, abandoning their acoustic instruments for electric guitars and a synthesizer. They’ve even renamed their version “Song for Carm,” shifting the focus to Tony’s wife and back to the song’s original subject: a woman who has suffered domestic violence fighting back, not gangsters. Continue reading »

May 112020
 
brian fallon license to kill cover

“License to Kill” is one of the most well-known tracks from Bob Dylan‘s notorious reggae-influenced album Infidels. At the time, Infidels was viewed by some as a bit of a return to form, as he stopped singing explicitly Christian songs for the first time in half a decade. Working with Sly & Robbie, Dylan delivered his new songs in a style he’d never attempted before. Continue reading »

Jan 132012
 

This Week on Bandcamp rounds up our favorite covers to hit the site in the past seven days.

Our second Bandcamp set of the new year takes on two songs from the ‘60s, one from the ‘70s, and two from the last few years. We’ve got ambient electropop, twee ballads, and dub reggae. So, yeah, as all over the place as usual. Continue reading »

Jan 062012
 

This Week on Bandcamp rounds up our favorite covers to hit the site in the past seven days.

It’s been a few weeks since we’ve checked in with the covers popping up on Bandcamp, but from the looks of it, the good material didn’t stop over the holiday break. So in lieu of the bedroom acoustic songs we often hear, we cherry-picked out some more thoughtful, complex productions from the surplus. Download ’em all below. Continue reading »

Dec 022011
 

This Week on Bandcamp rounds up our favorite covers to hit the site in the past seven days.

After taking last week off for Thanksgiving, we’re back with a double helping of new Bandcamp covers! Download 10 new covers below for your post-gluttony workout mix. Continue reading »