Seuras Og

Seuras Og is an old enough to know better family Dr in Birmingham, UK, having taken the easy option of medicine upon failure to get work in a record store. By now drowning in recorded music, he has thought it about time to waste the time of others in his passion here, as well as in his own blog,

Jan 302018

mark erelli mixtapeMark Erelli seems one of the good guys: prolific in the often solitary and lonely furrow of singer-songwritery, under the radar of most observers, weaving his nuanced mix of country and folk that never fails to beguile my ears. Lord knows how he makes a living. Along with others like Jeffrey Foucoult (with whom he has collaborated) Damien Jurado and the Joshes Rouse and Ritter (another collaborator) he seems always there in the background, a reliable source of well-crafted songs, never troubling the mainstream nor stealing the show.

Although he has a healthy and extensive repertoire of his own songs, covers are very much also his stock in trade, as a visit to his website soon reveals, with a monthly free download of the month – often a cover – unavailable elsewhere. (As I write his excellent version of “Midnight Rider” is serenading me, the January freebie.) He also performs an annual series of shows entitled ‘Under the Covers’ – sadly in the wrong continent for this writer to ever catch. Continue reading »

Jan 122018

Cover Classics takes a look at great covers albums of the past, their genesis and their legacies.

doc pomus tribute album

“Why now,” you ask. “Why focus on this album in 2018, more than 20 years since it was made and getting on 30 since the recipient of the tribute died? And who he anyway? He didn’t have any hits.”

Well, that’s where you are wrong. Doc Pomus wrote many of the 1950s songs we now see as standards – standards across many genres, encompassing blues through rock (and roll), with a hefty side influence into country and soul. Few people won’t have at least a whistling memory of at least one of these songs, probably more, in versions played by artists as diverse as ZZ Top, Engelbert Humperdinck and the Searchers. Continue reading »

Dec 072017

Cripes, quite how do I put this with sufficient diplomacy?

Some of you may have been drawn to this record by their knowledge of Jim James’ main band My Morning Jacket. Some of you, like me, may be interested based on the strength and range of the titles covered by Jim James. For it is an eclectic selection. Broadway to the Beach Boys, Emerson, Lake and Palmer to Sonny and Cher. And, yes, of course some Dylan. Catnip for covers lovers from the mainman in a bonafide cool hipster band.

Realizing it is almost 15 years since I last bought an album by My Morning Jacket, 2003’s It Still Moves, I wonder whether there has been, um, a change of direction in the intervening years. I somehow assumed they had stuck fast in their Skynyrd/Shakey hybrid. Or maybe Jim James – or “Yim Yames”, as I recall with a shudder he briefly rechristened himself a decade ago – keeps this other side for solo stuff like this. I am uncertain whether these interpretations are weird or just wonky, largely played so straight and so simply as to reveal more his weaknesses than his strengths as a singer. Which is a pity, as he has a fine, if limited voice. Continue reading »

Oct 132017

Some covers are more equal than others. Good, Better, Best looks at three covers and decides who takes home the gold, the silver, and the bronze.

Who does the best version of “God Only Knows”?

Accepting that the true answer is probably “Beach Boys, Beach Boys, Beach Boys,” this is a song oft covered and rarely, if ever, bettered, such is its beauty and ubiquity, as reliant on the arrangement as the melody, the lyrics as the singer. Most who have met the cover-me challenge have failed, duplicating and copying, facsimiles falling and failing at the shrine of St. Brian. And at the feet of St. Carl, for it is his sublime vocal that nails it. Some of these are pleasant enough – come in, Elvis Costello and Michael Stipe – but leave a memory that just longs for the original. A distinctive or different voice isn’t enough, as both Joss Stone and P.P.Arnold have discovered.
Continue reading »

Sep 012017

Shelby Lynne and Allison Moorer have released a new record, Not Dark Yet. It has been out a week or two, and I’m surprised this hasn’t yet had much shout here, unless the sole original song discounts the inclusion of this consummate otherwise all-covers showpiece. Neither of the two sisters (for they are) are strangers to a cover, each producing an example within their already expansive repertoires, Shelby with her exquisite reimagining of Dusty Springfield on 2009’s “Just a Little Lovin’,” and Allison with her “Mockingbird” the year before.

Intriguingly, this is their first studio joint performance, although they have appeared together on stage. There is talk of a previous falling out, but if so, it looks as if they have found each other and then some, their voices melding as only kin can. Some commentators have name-checked the Everly Brothers. That is no hyperbole. But this is so much more than a meeting of two voices, the choice of material helping Not Dark Yet rise above the play-it-by-numbers country feast they could have produced in their sleep, not that that couldn’t or wouldn’t have been good. By picking songs by Nick Cave and Kurt Cobain, amongst others, as well as choosing a latter-day Dylan song (the title track), Lynne and Moorer show their chops to be way beyond Nashville. OK, so we have some Townes and some Merle, even the Louvin Brothers, but also, in the opener, a track from the Killers. There is also a track by current golden boy Jason Isbell. It all works, as does the sole self-penned track, by Shelby, outlining their already-well-told childhood domestic chaos.

If that were not enough, the production and arrangements are top notch, thanks to Teddy (son of Richard) Thompson taking the producer’s chair (and not a few background vocals besides). The band for the sessions is a slew of some of the normal culprits for quality product in this vein, Benmont Tech (the Heartbreakers) on swirling keyboards, Doug Pettibone (Lucinda Williams go-to guitarist), and Michael Jerome and Taras Prodaniuk, from Teddy’s dad’s band. The sound is magnificent, complementing the vocals, aiding and abetting this essential release.

Not Dark Yet song listing:
1. My List (The Killers cover)
2. Every Time You Leave (The Louvin Brothers cover)
3. Not Dark Yet (Bob Dylan cover)
4. I’m Looking For Blue Eyes (Jessi Colter cover)
5. Lungs (Townes Van Zandt cover)
6. The Color of a Cloudy Day (Jason Isbell cover)
7. Silver Wings (Merle Haggard cover)
8. Into My Arms (Nick Cave cover)
9. Lithium (Nirvana cover) 5
10. Is It Too Much (Shelby Lynne original)

You can purchase Not Dark Yet on Amazon.

Jul 142017

If you are a regular reader of this site, you may remember this post from a couple months back, about the (to my ears) hotly anticipated shared project between English folkstrel Olivia Chaney and Portland quirkmeisters the Decemberists. Well, the lovely people at Nonesuch have now released Offa Rex’s The Queen of Hearts, and mighty fine it is too.

Chaney may not be especially well known to many, unless you were lucky enough to catch the last round of occasional Joe Boyd-curated Nick Drake tribute shows, featuring a host of singers and musicians from varied sources. Chaney was undoubtedly one of the stars of the one I saw, alongside company like Glen Hansard and Sam “Iron and Wine” Beam. This led me to her 2015 release, The Longest River, which I can commend. The Decemberists are much better known and have long been drawn to the canon of trad.arr., especially singer Colin Meloy. Indeed, one might surmise the seeds for Offa Rex were sown by a tour-only EP Meloy produced in 2006, Colin Meloy Sings Shirley Collins. Indeed, Meloy says he invited Chaney to the table by suggesting in a tweet that his band be her Albion Country Band. Queen of Hearts shows them not making a half-bad shot of it, with side-orders aplenty of Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span, not to mention a little of fellow U.S. travelers 10,000 Maniacs on the keyboard swirl of “Bonnie May.”
Continue reading »