Mike Misch

The first cassette tape Mike ever owned was MC Hammer's "Too Legit to Quit." He has spent the following years trying to repair his severely damaged "indie cred." He first recognized the power of cover songs when he heard Dave Matthew's Band cover Soul Coughing's "Is Chicago, Is Not Chicago." As part of his musical education, he is working his way through Tom Moon's excellent book, "The 1000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die" and tracking his progress at Recording the Recordings and on Twitter. Mike currently lives in Maryland but his heart still bleeds for Cleveland sports teams (yes, really).

1994 was 20 years ago. That may not be news to many of our readers, but there is a certain 30-something subset of you who just sprayed your screen with water in a hilarious spit-take that would not be at all out of place on the show Friends (also 20 years old this year, by the way). Continue reading »

The last time we mentioned Twin Shadow aka George Lewis, Jr., he was performing Lou Reed’s “Perfect Day” just one day after Reed’s death. He did it well enough for it to be named one of Cover Me’s favorite songs of 2013. Now he’s back and performing another throwback in the form of The Smiths‘ “There is a Light That Never Goes Out” for his monthly UNDER THE CVRS series. Continue reading »

30 years ago the Violent Femmes released their self-titled debut. If you grew up in the ’90s hearing “Blister in the Sun” on alternative radio and Middle School dances alike, you might be shocked to learn that song came out in 1983. Although much music from the ’80s hasn’t aged well, Violent Femmes still holds up pretty nicely. Continue reading »

Have you heard? Daft Punk put out a new album this summer! It’s even got a pretty catchy single; maybe you’ve heard it? “Get Lucky”? Featuring Pharrell?

Ok, yeah, you’ve probably heard it a million times at this point, and a ton of covers along with it. Well, get ready, because we’ve got two more great versions to add to our previous five best. Continue reading »

“Grinnin’ in Your Face,” by Delta blues pioneer Son House is a sparse affair: House claps while he sings about the value of true friendship, and that pretty much sums it up. Powerful, catchy, and simple. The cover by L.A.-via-Oregon singer, ZZ Ward, keeps that simplicity while modernizing this classic. Continue reading »

Funkadelic is the slightly lesser known iteration of George Clinton‘s Parliament (who eventually toured under the name Parliament-Funkadelic, or P-Funk), but their critically-acclaimed Maggot Brain is packed with, well, funky dance tracks (and one mind-blowing guitar solo). “Can You Get to That” highlights the ensemble, freestyle feel of the album, with multiple vocalists and plenty of impromptu shouts. Recently, former member of the Staples Singers, Mavis Staples, recorded her own soulful version. Continue reading »

The music of Mark Kozelek, whether made with his former band Red House Painters, under his own name, or as Sun Kil Moon, has been described many ways: dreamy, melancholic, and wistful come to mind. With the release of his newest covers album, Like Rats, you can add creepy to the list. The songs he’s picked to cover have lyrics that are alternately menacing and depressing, either overtly or because they’ve been stripped of their accompanying upbeat music. Kozelek has never shied away from darker themes in his music: the yearning loss in RHP’s “Michael,” death and loneliness (and maybe serial killers?) in SKM’s “Glenn Tipton,” regret and self-pity in his cover of John Denver’s “I’m Sorry.” Kozelek’s voice often soars over the intricate guitars, though, and its sweetness lends the songs a faint glimmer of hope. But on “Like Rats,” he sings a register lower than usual (more on that decision later) and piles dark song upon dark song until the listener is off-balance from the assault of negativity. The album is barely 30 minutes in length, and anything more might be too much. Continue reading »

A.V. Undercover from the A.V. Club has a very simple equation: 25 songs+25 artists= 25 unique covers. As each band enters the studio they choose from the remaining songs, covering them faithfully, or more often, creatively. The results speak for themselves over the years, from GWAR being stuck with Kansas‘ “Carry on My Wayward Son,” to Iron & Wine‘s version of George Michael‘s “One More Try,” to They Might Be Giants including the staff of the A.V. Club to join in on Chumbawamba‘s “Tubthumping.” Continue reading »

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