Angela Hughey

Angela Hughey lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband and is ruled by two tiny people and a Boston Terrier named Rocko. When not Mommin’ it, she’s in her photography studio taking fine art portraits of other people’s tiny people. A musician of 30 years with a piano degree, she has been in several bands, most recently The Summit, an alternative/indie cover band consisting of music nerds who love to pick apart songs and talk about diminished chords. “If I should ever die, God forbid, let this be my epitaph: The only proof he needed for the existence of God was music” Kurt Vonnegut

Aug 142017
 
glen campbell covers

The world lost a quintessentially American artist with the passing of Glen Campbell last week. Dolly Parton called Campbell “one of the greatest voices of all time”, and his incredible career certainly supports her praise. Hits that toed the line between country and pop included “Rhinestone Cowboy”, “Wichita Lineman”, “Gentle on My Mind”, and “Southern Nights.”

Many of those hits were covers, including his most well-known, “Rhinestone Cowboy.” Originally recorded by Larry Weiss, the song made little impact initially, but became an instant hit in the States once Campbell took it up a year later. Campbell’s charming, heartfelt vocals combined with soaring instrumentals perfectly encapsulated the theme: Continue reading »

Aug 072017
 
sky ferreira easy

Director Edgar Wright’s seat-of-your-pants heist film Baby Driver features a carefully chosen group of songs that are set in perfect time to the action on the screen. City sounds and the movements of the actors and actresses work in time with the music with ease. It’s not often that a soundtrack precedes a movie, but in Baby Driver, it even inspired it.

One of the soundtrack’s standouts is Sky Ferreira’s cover of The Commodore’s “Easy”. Ferreira’s blend of drums, guitar, organ, and vibraphone feels just right reinterpreting the cool, seemingly untouchable vibe of the original. Continue reading »

Jul 252017
 
linkin park covers

It’s sad that the incredible talent given to many musicians is burdened by demons such as addiction, anxiety, and depression. It’s sad that so much of the music that they give us is inspired by struggles that fuel those demons and can feel so unsurmountable. It’s sad to think of all of the people those musicians have helped with their music, only to succumb to the darkness themselves in the end.

We have lost another great musician with the passing of Chester Bennington. Bennington’s band Linkin Park realized the climax of the so-called nu-metal movement with their album Hybrid Theory, which successfully brought to the mainstream a combination of metal and pop (hence the “Hybrid”). The style that Linkin Park created resulted in accolades for the band and their albums as they continued to explore combining musical styles. Ultimately, though, it was the intensity, emotional depth, and point blank honesty in Bennington’s lyrics and delivery which resonated with so many.

A particularly gorgeous rendition of one of Linkin Park’s songs is Scott D. Davis‘s piano take on “In the End”. The melody is highly effective even without the support of a band. Continue reading »

Jul 242017
 
applewood road cover

On their debut album, the three ladies of Applewood Road have perfected the art of the blend. Their intricate and layered harmonies drill into the quality of every note while simultaneously sounding effortless and breezy.

If you haven’t heard of these extraordinary musicians yet, you will soon. We’ve written about all three in their various solo endeavors in the past: Amy Speace, Emily Barker, and Amber Rubarth. Popular already in the UK, they are poised to take over the US with the upcoming release of their self titled album. In addition to their fantastic originals, the album includes a cover of R.E.M.‘s “Losing My Religion”. Continue reading »

Jun 262017
 
jack white american epic

Every once and awhile, a musical project comes along that reminds us of the magnitude of talent and ingenuity many of our current musicians possess. The American Epic series by PBS is one such project. Directed by Bernard McMahon, American Epic re-imagines the music captured by record companies way back in the 1920’s. But not just any music. “Country singers in the Appalachians, blues guitarists in the Mississippi Delta, Gospel preachers across the south, Cajun fiddlers in Louisiana, Tejano groups from the Texas Mexico border, Native American drummers in Arizona, and Hawaiian musicians”. The record companies gave a musical voice to so many talented, undiscovered musicians at that time.

To make the project authentic, the American Epic team reassembled the very first electrical sound recording system which was used back in the 1920s. They then tasked executive producers Jack White and T Bone Burnett to create an album of recordings by twenty of today’s artists, all recorded on the only system of this kind in the world. The result is a fantastic throwback to long ago brought to us by some seriously talented and committed musicians. Continue reading »

Jun 122017
 
phantogram hole cover

Phantogram has yet again crafted a super chill cover of an inherently frantic song. Their recent cover of Radiohead’s “Weird Fishes/Arpeggi” features a down tempodrum beat and Sarah Barthel’s silky smooth vocals which combined, result in a hypnotic haze. They adopt a similar approach to Hole’s “Violet”.

Gone is the angst ridden scream singing of the original. Courtney Love’s passionate, off-key, and messy delivery is replaced by Barthel’s similarly passionate, but beautifully precise and ethereal take on the song. The band sits at polar opposites as well. Love’s band is all in with as much rock angst as can be mustered, whereas Barthel’s band adopts a decidedly relaxed accompaniment with easy guitars and mallets on the drums. Continue reading »