Five Good Covers presents five cross-genre reinterpretations of an oft-covered song.

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When Bruce Springsteen was touring behind his 2005 album Devils and Dust, he closed his shows with a cover of the song “Dream Baby Dream” by the protopunk band Suicide. Most fans of the Boss were unfamiliar with it, and didn’t know how to take the moody mantra, sung over the drone of a pump organ and an offstage synth – “Glory Days” it ain’t. It turned out Bruce had been a fan of Suicide’s since meeting them in a studio in the ’70s, and had claimed in one interview that “You know, if Elvis came back from the dead I think he would sound like Alan Vega.” As for Vega, once he’d heard Springsteen’s interpretation, he said, “Now I can die…. He interpreted my song, he did it his way, and such a great way that I’m going to have to sing it that way, or not sing it at all anymore…. On my death bed, that’s the last thing I’m going to listen to. I’ll play it at my funeral.” So it’s safe to say he liked it.
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Full Albums features covers of every track off a classic album. Got an idea for a future pick? Leave a note in the comments!

Maybe it is too facile to say that Van Morrison’s second solo album, Astral Weeks, is respected, while its follow up, Moondance, is loved. We looked at Astral Weeks about a year ago, so there’s no reason to repeat that here, but it’s clear that Morrison took a very different approach with the two albums, both of which have entered the rock pantheon as classics (for example, both albums were inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame and Astral Weeks is 19 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Albums of all time; Moondance was ranked 66.) But while the older album is revered as a work of art, you actually heard (and still hear) songs from Moondance on the radio. Astral Weeks failed to chart, and no singles from the album were released, but Moondance reached 29 on the Billboard Pop Album chart, and had three singles released.

Astral Weeks is considered to be a unified song cycle or a concept album, filled with stream of consciousness lyrics. The musicians that were recruited mostly had jazz backgrounds, and Morrison encouraged them to improvise after hearing Morrison play the songs on an acoustic guitar. Despite critical acclaim, it received little commercial airplay and limited support from the label, Warner Bros.

After recording Astral Weeks, Morrison and his wife moved into a mountaintop house near Woodstock, in upstate New York. He began to write the songs for Moondance and recruited local musicians for the recording sessions. Although, like with his previous album, there were no formal written charts, Morrison focused this time on shorter, more upbeat and optimistic songs with accessible song structures, in part influenced by another group of Woodstock area residents, The Band. It also was greeted with great reviews, but garnered significantly more radio airplay and immediate sales than its predecessor. And, I would argue, few albums have a stronger first side (when that mattered) than Moondance (“And It Stoned Me”/”Moondance”/”Crazy Love”/”Caravan”/”Into The Mystic”), and side 2 isn’t shabby, either.
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We may not get to see much of her face, but we have been hearing a ton from Sia. We have heard snippets of her The Mamas & the Papas cover during the trailer of the upcoming San Andreas film (starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson), but the Internet, being the Internet, has produced the full rendition.

Sia’s powerhouse vocals are at an all time high, backed by haunting orchestration. Sia has the uncanny power to transform anything, even a folksy, nostalgic sort of ditty, into an evocative anthem that demands to be listened to on repeat.

Listen to more Sia on her official website.

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First and foremost, I will start off by admitting I had no clue this was originally Cher‘s song. Then again, on first hearing Nancy Sinatra in Kill Bill Vol.1, I should have expected no less from Quentin Tarantino than to feature yet another brilliant cover song to accompany his film (after all, he did do it in Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, and Jackie Brown). Continue reading »

dawes

Warren Zevon was one of the most underappreciated artists in his time, at least by the general public. Sure, “Werewolves of London” gets heavy rotation between “The Monster Mash” and “Ghostbusters” on radio stations in October, but the rest of his catalog goes mostly unnoticed. Continue reading »

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What kind of songs do you think an indie folk duo from Toronto that describe themselves as a “cookie-tin pedal enthusiast …[and a] purveyor of ghost-noises” would cover? Robyn? The Beach Boys? Luckily, yes and yes! Continue reading »

Elsie

From Dutch symphonic metal band Within Temptation and English alt-rock group Placebo, to electro pop duo Avec Sans and British singer-songwriter Will Young, “Running Up That Hill” has certainly seen its fair share of cover versions.  Continue reading »

Five Good Covers presents five cross-genre reinterpretations of an oft-covered song.

logical

Written by Supertramp’s Roger Hodgson (with an assist on the second chorus’s vocal harmony by Rick Davies), “The Logical Song” not only has more words of three or more syllables (twenty-seven!) than some bands have in their entire discography; it also has a warning about using schooling as a brickbat that resonates even more post-No Child Left Behind. Plus which, that saxophone break would send any contemporaries whimpering their way back to Baker Street. It was the band’s biggest hit off their biggest album, Breakfast in America; that unforgettable cover model, Kate Murtagh, is 94 and still going, much like “The Logical Song” itself.
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